The Third Eye Books Orhan Pamuk Novels Orhan Pamuk Novels The Third Eye Books The Third Eye Books The Third Eye Books The Third Eye Books The Third Eye Books
The Third Eye Books
The Third Eye Books
The Third Eye Books
How to Make Books Online
The Third Eye Books
The Third Eye Books
The Third Eye Books
The Third Eye Books Orhan Pamuk Novels Third Eye The Third Eye Books The Third Eye Books The Third Eye Books Orhan Pamuk Novels The Third Eye Books The Third Eye Books The Third Eye Books The Third Eye Books The Third Eye Books The Third Eye Books The Third Eye Books The Third Eye Books The Third Eye Books The Third Eye Books


The Third Eye Books



Where did Angela Carter get her ideas from?


Thirty-two years ago, Bristol writer Tony Crofts had a neat idea. It was for an inverted pastiche of de Sade's "Justine", with a male protagonist living in a world where women treat men as work objects, in all the ways that, historically, men have regarded women as sex objects.


Justin lives in a city with a high-walled centre inhabited by male down-and-outs tyrannised over by queen bees, who force them to make andro-porn movies for sale to middle-class women in the outer suburbs. Out there, people only move from building to building in cars: no one walks. And when Justin sets out on foot to try to contact a Swedish girl visitor whom he met and fell in love with on a school outing, the police grab him and chuck him over the wall.


Rescued by his mother, whom he meets when working as a bar boy in an entertainment centre, he is reunited with his love. But as they come together, the house is invaded by Ku Klux Klanswomen who ritually emasculate him.


Having had it refused by Virago - on the grounds that he was not a woman writer - Tony sent the MS to Angela, a former friend and neighbour, who was just successfully establishing herself with her second novel, offering her an agent's commission if she could help him place it.


She never returned it, but it obviously exercised a powerful hold on her imagination. Three years later, she produced The Passion of New Eve, a novel about a ruined New York surrounded by a wall and ruled by rampant feminist terrorists. They capture the protagonist, and surgically transform him into a woman. A year later, she followed up with Sadeian Woman, a study of Justine. "She is a child who knows how to be good to please daddy; but the existence of daddy, her god, the abstract virtue to which she constantly refers, prevents her from acting for herself."


The two novels' similarity is startling. Their contrasts, even more so. Justin is a male writer's attempt at bringing male readers to realise what their traditional treatment made women feel. It reads like a roller coaster, and is full of blue and black humour. New Eve is a surreal projecting of a male character into the experience of being a woman, by a female writer with an always-quizzical attitude towards her own womanhood.


Remember the articles she wrote for Men Only, about her two-year affair with a Japanese "who finally decided the time had come for me to be lobotomised". Or the early short story about the bed her father built for her that collapsed nearly killing her first boyfriend...


Reading the two together gives a unique insight into the imagination of a highly controversial writer and her way with found material.


You can buy Justin Aveneer online at Amazon.co.uk or direct from Third Eye Books.



Third Eye Books, 3 Windsor Terrace, Clifton, Bristol BS8 4LW

phone 0117 9265 931 or email third.eye@virgin.net